We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. Accept | Find out more

x

Three Perfect Days: Portland

America’s hipster capital is home to world-class dining, dozens of microbreweries, a quirky arts scene and some of the most beautiful parks and natural landscapes in the country. Other than that, it’s pretty nice here.

Author Justin Goldman

Stumptown Coffee Roasters / Laura Dart

Picture 8 of 12

Portland has more than its share of nicknames—Stumptown, Brewvana, Bridgetown, PDX, Rip City, the City of Roses—but odds are you haven’t heard many of them. Despite being home to iconic indie artists like Gus Van Sant and Elliott Smith, not to mention some of the best microbreweries in the world, to most people Portland is just a small Pacific Northwest city that gets a lot of rain.

Recently, though—due in part to “Portlandia,” the IFC comedy that lovingly lampoons hipster culture—Portland’s public profile has been on the rise. The city (motto: “Keep Portland Weird”) has become a magnet for creative types, drawn to its bookstores, record shops, music venues, public artworks and tattoo parlors. As Fred Armisen puts it on “Portlandia,” it’s “a city where young people go to retire.”

But you don’t have to be a clued-in 20-something to enjoy Portland. Thick with public parks and surrounded by pristine forests and mountains, it’s a dream locale for outdoors enthusiasts. The damp climate and proximity to first-rate farms also provide the thriving restaurant, winery and brewery scene with an abundance of fresh ingredients. Those seeking traditional cultural outlets, meanwhile, can avail themselves of Portland’s museums and art galleries, many of which have taken over industrial spaces across the city.

Today, the national media’s appreciation for the city has become so ardent that locals refer to the blitz of coverage as “stalking.” But Portlanders remain exceedingly friendly—you shouldn’t be surprised if one offers you a ride into town from the airport and regales you with recommendations the whole way. People are especially cheery in the summer, when the clouds part, brewpub patios hum, and cycling becomes the only acceptable form of transportation, be it to an art fair or an organic grocery.

iphone5_hemi
This and archived issues
of Three Perfect Days
are available for free
on the iPhone. Just
search “Three Perfect
Days” or “Hemispheres”
in the iTunes store!



3 Responses to “Three Perfect Days: Portland”

  1. Sue lang Says:
    July 16th, 2014 at 7:21 am

    Thank you

  2. Cornelius Cornhagen Says:
    July 29th, 2014 at 12:21 pm

    The second-person narrative is kind of creepy. Are they ordering me to do this stuff? Are they presciently forecasting my future? Is the author having an out-of-body experience?

  3. Julee Jackson Says:
    September 1st, 2014 at 10:30 am

    I was born and raised in Portland and vicinity. I now live in Florida. Returning to Portland for a few days vacation and LOVED this article. Will check out most of places this article refers to. Thanks, downloading it now. Having trouble finding a way to download the iPhone app though.

Leave your comments


*