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Economy Plus Comfort on International Flights

What’s new at United

UNITED IS NOW offering Economy Plus seating on all long-haul international Boeing 757-200 flights, providing economy customers the option of 6 inches of extra legroom.

The 41 aircraft operate principally between New York/Newark and Amsterdam, Barcelona, Belfast, Berlin, Birmingham, Copenhagen, Dublin, Edinburgh, Frankfurt, Glasgow, Hamburg, Lima, Lisbon, London, Madrid, Manchester, Oslo, Paris, Shannon, Stockholm and Stuttgart, and between Washington Dulles and Amsterdam and Paris.

The 757-200 reconfiguration project, which began in late November, outfits those aircraft with 1,845 Economy Plus seats. Each aircraft will have 16 flat-bed seats in BusinessFirst, 45 seats in Economy Plus and 108 seats in economy.

Customers with Premier status in United’s MileagePlus and OnePass frequent flyer programs may confirm complimentary seat assignments in Economy Plus, when available. All other customers may buy Economy Plus seating, when available, online at united.com, with a reservations agent or at the airport.

United introduced Economy Plus in 1999. Today, the company offers the extra-legroom seating on more than 400 mainline aircraft and more than 150 regional jets. When fully deployed, United will offer customers more extra-legroom economy-class seats than any other airline in the world.

ASK THE PILOT

With Captain Mike Bowers

Q: Why do airplanes sometimes accelerate and then reduce speed — repeatedly, in some cases — as they’re preparing to land?
A: You’re most likely sensing the power changing back and forth during the landing approach, which certainly can feel like a change in speed. That throttle movement is intended to keep the aircraft at a steady speed throughout the approach and landing. Landing an aircraft requires pilots to maintain a much more precise speed than in cruise flight. Because of changing wind currents and other factors, we must adjust the power settings to maintain that desired speed. The more the wind is gusting, the more corrections we need to make in the power setting. So it’s not the speed that is changing at all — it’s the pilot adjusting the power to prevent the speed from changing.

Do you have a question for Captain Bowers? Write to him at askthepilot@united.com.

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